This is another useful and interesting accessory for Pentax 67 lenses. While doing mostly black-and-white photography, it is almost impossible to go without special color filters helping to convert colors to black and white in line with your idea, allowing you to control the way they appear in the final image and ensuring that objects are well-separated and clearly defined.

In this article we will not focus on what filters to use in certain situations. The sheer number of filters used is quite limited, it is a standard set, and their use largely depends on your personal preferences. I, for instance, mostly use 1A (Skylight), Y2, O2, which are bayonet-type mounts, and sometimes YG, which is a screw mount, with my lenses.

Pentax 67 Bayonet mount filter closeup

Pentax 67 Bayonet mount filter closeup

In the black-and-white photography you have to alternate filters quite often, sometimes very often – yellow to orange, then orange to yellow, and the other way round. And this triggers a question about their usability. A majority of Pentax 67 lenses have a bayonet filter option, which allows you to mount both bayonet and threaded filters, as well as to combine them together. That is really great feature!

Bayonet mount

Let’s look at the bayonet mount closeup. Top image: female mount with two recesses in the thread. It permits another bayonet or screw-in filter. The lenses have the same female mount which also accepts both filter types. Bottom image: male mount with two tabs. It has a very convenient design allowing to change filters quickly and also to stack them together and to remove them just as quickly.

Sometimes I use a combination of threaded and bayonet filters. I have a threaded YG which I screw onto the bayonet 1A and as a result get a filter which is almost identical to bayonet one, as the impact of 1A filter on black-and-white film can be neglected. What can be easier and more convenient?

Filters

Some of these data are taken from the Asahi’s original filters manual.

UV 1A Y2 O2 R2 YG 81A 82A Lenses
67mm S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
C S
C
C 90mm f/2.8 LS, 90mm f/2.8, 105mm f/2.4, 135mm f/4 Macro, 150mm f/2.8, 165mm f/2.8, 200mm f/4 (T)
77mm S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
C S
C
C 55mm f/4 (I), 400mm f/4, 600mm f/4, 800mm f/4, 1000mm f/8 Mirror
82mm S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
C S
C
C 45mm f/4, 75mm f/4.5, 75mm f/4.5 Shift, 300mm f/4
95mm S S S S S S 500mm f/5.6
100mm S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
S
C
C S
C
C 55mm f/3.5
Exposure factor 1.5× 1.5× The shutter speed should be multiplyed by this value to get the film properly exposed.
F-stop compensation 0 0 1 1.5 2.5 1 0.5 0.5 The aperture should be opened by this extra f-stop to get the film properly exposed.
“S” for multi coated filters. “C” for single coated filters

P.S.

All this is also true for the color photography, but in general the use of filters there is more infrequent than in the black-and-white photography. Of course, I have 80A and 85 but use them sporadically, that is why when I required them I just bought ordinary threaded filters.

Sasha Krasnov